Tuesday, December 6, 2016

A Peek Inside Operation Christmas Child


"My friend invited us to go with their family to work with Operation Christmas Child." My daughter thumbed through her text. "The day after Thanksgiving. May we go?"

"Yes." 

Come Black Friday, we drove the hour trip into the Dallas area, met the family, and walked into a huge warehouse filled with plain brown shipping boxes, showcasing "Samaritan's Purse."






The warmth flooded the room, the smiles, the greetings from strangers. We ushered into a holding room and watched a film over our volunteer work. I placed my "chaperone" sticker and my name tag on my shirt. The kids received the "student" stickers.We followed a lady through the huge warehouse full of tables and workers. 

Shouts rang out.

"When a shipping box is completely packed with shoe-boxes, everyone shouts, competing to see who can shout the loudest," the lady explained.

She led us to our very own worktable#13and opened one huge brown shipping box. We peeked over the edge to see it packed to the brim with green-and-red shoeboxes.

Everyone received their assigned job for the day. I took on the job of sorting through shoeboxesin other words, each packed box had to be unpackedensuring each individual shoebox was full and that there was nothing harmful in itno liquids, no weapons. My youngest daughter stood at my side sorting through boxes with me, with her older sister next to her, who helped tape the boxes we passed along.




I glanced up between boxes to see smiles on faces. I reached for a new box, and my daughter beat me to it. We laughed.

My feet stood right where they needed to be.

My fingers felt over my "chaperone" tag on my jacket. Me? Chaperone? No. Me? Student? Yes.

I yearned to exchange tags with my daughter, letting her wear the "chaperone" and letting me take on the "student."



















Without my girls, without the invitation, my feet would not be planted on the Operation Christmas Child's warehouse floor. My heart had not been invested in the past. Oh, I'd assembled boxes, but never with my whole heart. I would never have driven that hour in Dallas traffic, the day after Thanksgiving, on my own. Never.

My heart needed nudging, prompting. My hand needed holding, guiding, leading, encouraging.

We placed hands on the boxes before us and prayed over them.




Something strange happened. The brown turned to green-and-red. My heart began to feel invested, invested in the children whom I couldn't even see, whom I'd never even meet. 

I stumbled across a shoebox that wasn't packed properly. And I found myself getting defensive over each one I checked and packed. I felt slight aggravation at the unknown persons who'd assembled them poorly.

But who was I to grumble in my heart? I thought of all the shoeboxes I had thrown away that year. I reprimanded myself secretly. I hadn't packed a shoebox in a few years, since the girls have gotten older, since they hadn't prompted me to help make one. Since they hadn't held my hand and led me there. 

Since my eyes weren't fully seeing.

I reached into the bins full of toys before me, selected a few things, like a stuffed animal or a children's Bible, and filled the shoebox. It only lacked one thingcandy. I wished for a bucket of candy so that I could add sweetness to the boxes that were lacking. 

My heart is invested.




I ran across a shoebox that clearly had been packed with an over-abundance of lovedolls, stuffed animals, candy. Someone did it right, and some child will be blessed by their hands. My heart clapped for those unknown persons.

I passed the finished shoebox along, and my daughter taped it shut. Friends packed the beautiful Christmas color into the plain ol' shipping box, bringing it to life there in the warehouse, there in my heart. Shouts rang out, starting a contagion of shouts down the line. We'd filled another shipping box, ready to go overseas.

"Do you want to go to lunch?" the lady asked.

I turned to the girls. "Are y'all hungry? Do you want to take a lunch break?"

"No, let's keep working," they agreed.

I smiled. "Yes, let's keep working. Our time's too short. We can eat after." We can eat anytime.

Why?

We took a peek inside, and now our hearts are fully invested.




























We took a peek inside,
our stubborn hearts were tested,
and now we see in color,
our hearts fully invested.

~~


Thank you, Peek Family

**

Are you volunteering anywhere special this year? What is God teaching you?

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

When A Broken Heart Yearns For A Break


From my heart to yours this Thanksgiving



My daughter's normal morning 3-day-a-week school routine begins.

"You awake?" I text to her from downstairs, under the covers, snug as a bug in a rug.

"Yup," she texts back.

One foot slips out from under the covers, then the other. Un-snug as a bug out of a rug. Leaning over the bathroom counter, I get partially ready for the day, make-up and hair, then I'm off to scan the living room and kitchen to see if my daughter has left any school work there that she might need for the day. I grab a bottled water out of the garage fridge and a granola bar from the pantry for her.

My heart yearns for her success.

The door to her stairs/bedroom billows open and the rush begins. I open the garage door, hug and kiss her goodbye, shoving the water and granola bar into her backpack. She backs the car out, careful not to hit a tree. I wave goodbye and blow kisses to her ... she stalls the car to wave and return my kisses. We realize it's our last gaze at each other. 

That little black car zooms off down our driveway, kicking up leaves, beginning that 35-minute commute by busy, 18-wheeler interstate.




And I pray, like every dayLord, watch over her, protect her, get her home to me.

My heart yearns for her safety.

But this particular day, after some 5 minutes have passed, my phone buzzes with a call. It's her.

"Hey."

"Hey, Mom." Her tone is urgent. "I left my driver's license in your car. I'll be home in two minutes. Will you get it for me?"

I run out to the car. There it is. I open the garage again.

My mind starts going wild. Will she be late for school now? Will she drive too fast to get there on time? She's almost home ... she said 2 minutes. I'll save her time.

My heart yearns for every good and perfect thing for her.

With barely a moment's thought, I take off down my long, wet driveway, barefoot, in my pajamas. I'll meet here there at the end of the road. Lord, please don't let me step on a stick or an acorn. As I near the end, I see her car between trees. 




She pulls into the driveway. She sees me running. Her expression? Priceless.

My heart yearns to make her smile.

"I can't back out, Mom."

"Yes, you can. I'll help you." I walk out into the middle of our county road in my pajamas, guiding her, motioning to her which way to turn her wheels. She does it. I knew she could do it. 

My heart yearns for her to be confident.

She zooms off again. My prayer goes up once again.

At the end of the day, she barrels through the door, crying. Wrapping her arms around me, she spills her precious heart. She barely missed being in an auto accident. I sink in despair over the details her precious eyes witnessed. My fractured heart looks heavenward, and my prayer shoots upthank you, Lord, for bringing her home to me.

My heart yearns for peace. 

For her. For me.

Every week, I hear her near misses or what she's witnessed on the road. My heart can barely take it. 

My right eyelid's been flickering like a fluorescent light for days now.

It's all worry, y'all.

My daughter's first semester of college has been the hardest change for me. If there is one downside to homeschooling that I've discovered, it's that a mama's heart is too sheltered. It's the mama's heart that's cause for concern. And the heart stays invested regardless of your child's age.

But she loves it. She loves every single thing about itthe school, her classes, the commute, time in her car, lunch out with friendswhich is all that matters. And I'm so thankful. 

But this mama thought she knew how to lean on God. This mama's heart is learning to lean, lean on my Savior, more and more. 

After Thanksgiving, my daughter will only have about two weeks left of school, before she has a month break. I'm so grateful because

My broken heart yearns for a break. 






What has you concerned lately? And can you imagine our Father's love over us?

~~~~

Happy Thanksgiving, y'all. And many thanks to all who entered the magazine subscription giveaway from the last post. Thank you for playing. I'm blowing kisses your way. I cherish you. 

And the winners are ...

Cindy Hasko and Norma Brumbaugh Wieland

Woohoo! I pray you are blessed by the magazine all year long.



Tuesday, November 8, 2016

A Thanksgiving Giveaway


Gratefulness swept over my heart as I opened my editor's email, revealing my article contracts for the upcoming yeara blessing and a gift. Another year of writing, of hearing amazing mission stories, of listening to the hearts of people across the globe and to the hearts of people just down the road. 




I don't take the writing opportunity for granted because one, my confidence level doesn't soar, and two, there are boo-koos of writers to fill my disposable shoes.




Every single story touches my heart, changes me, in one way or another. Thankful.

Two missions touched my heart so much that I've written novels about them. And I'm looking for a third idea, so if you know of a heart-touching mission, I'd love to hear about it.

Closing down my email, I realized that it's been 8 years since I've been writing for Woman's Missionary Union. Eight years. Thankful.

When I first received the invitation to write for WMU, it was July 4th weekend of 2008 and family was visiting. Excitement spiraled through me over the opportunity, but fear shook me.

My sister-in-law sat in the rocking chair next to me.

"I got asked to write a missions article. I don't know what to do," I said.

"What do you mean?"

"I'll be calling Africa, and talking to a 19-year-old young woman from Brazil. Her story is too important ... entrusted to me? I'm scared." Tears surfaced. "I'm scared I can't do it or won't do it justice. She deserves better than me."

"Shelli, you can do this." She smiled, rocking in that chair. "You can do this." Thankful.





And I've been doing this for 8 years. I can still hear that sweet girl's Brazilian accent ... and I'm so blessed to keep up with her on Facebook, all the way in Brazil now. Her mother even wrote to thank me for the article. Her letter was written in Portuguese, and I had to ask for an interpreter. Thankful.

When I receive the magazine that one of my articles is in ... my heart swells with gratitude. Seeing my work in print never gets old. But seeing God use the stories to bless people or encourage missions or support missions ... that's the sweetest. Thankful.

I'll tell you that sometimes I feel a tinge of guilt that I write about missions more than I do them. But my editor continually reminds me each year that writers are important ... that they help share what's happening in missions around the world. That it takes everyone doing their part. Thankful.

But I'll let you in on a little secret ... I've been a stay-at-home wife and mom for most of my adult life, and because of that, I've always had to watch each dime. And here's the secretI look forward to the day that I can take a week or two mission trip overseas. What group will God have prepared for me? What will their sweet faces look like? What will their hugs feel like?

But missions is everywhere and needed everywhere. My latest November 2016 cover story is on missions here at home, in Philadelphia, about being thankful in tough times. There's much need all around us. And I have my sights set on a mission to help here in Texas ... I've just got to get in gear and join in.





















So with this 8-year-mark, I want to shout out my gratitudefor writing opportunity, for God's undeserved grace and mercy, for so many things, but especially for you. Thank you for always reading my "scribblings" and supporting me. Even a "hello" brings so much encouragement along this journey. Thankful.

And because of that, I'm so excited to do a fun giveaway, offering two one-year subscriptions to Missions Mosaic magazine. If you have a heart for missions or have a family member who loves missions, this giveaway is for you. It's a perfect Christmas gift for yourself or a loved one.
























What should you do to enter? 

Be a U.S. or Canadian resident and simply leave a comment in the comment section, stating that you'd like to be entered. Or hop over and leave a comment on my Facebook page or my Instagram @shelli_littleton ...

If you comment in three places, you can be entered up to 3 times, max. 

*2 Winners

And I'm so sorry that I can't offer the giveaway to my dear friends across the water. I so love you.


~~~

"Be joyful always; pray continually; give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God's will for you in Christ Jesus" 
1 Thessalonians 5: 16-18

What are you most thankful for? Is there something you hope to do/accomplish one day?

*The giveaway will close November 17th at midnight Central Time and the winners will be announced on Nov 22nd. The subscriptions will be ordered immediately, just in time for Christmas.



Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Stepping Into My Characters' Shoes


God, what are you doing with my life?

"Do you want to go?"

"Yes, of course."

My curiosity soars. My novel, work-in-continual-progress, has a scene in this very location. I'd love to go. I need to go. I need to get inside my characters' heads more, know their hearts. Plant my feet where they planted theirs.

We pass Greenville, Texas, heading into Commercemy novel's setting and the city I have grown to love. "There's Karalee's school," I say. Wonder where she's at? What's she doing? Hard to believe my oldest daughter is there and I'm here. This thing called change is interesting. Our hearts are so intertwined that I feel present with her all the time. Rejoice when she rejoices. Cry when she cries.

We proceed out toward the state park, passing farm after farm. Beautiful Texas, always beautiful to this Texan. 

I gasp. A city limit sign announces "Posey" ... Posey, Texas. My heart claps. That's part of my itty-bitty character's nickname. I missed that detail on Google Earth. Wow. Unbelievable. 





Believable.

God, you've got this thing covered. I know you do. And you're showing me the signs. Thank you.


We park the vehicle. 

My youngest steps out, branches out, and begins exploring. The one who's seen devastating hardship. My cancer survivor. She's discovering shells along the water's edge. She's found her niche.

Have I found my niche? I think so. 

My feet hit the ground. I pivot, absorbing the surrounding beauty, standing right where my characters stood. Building their imaginary lives has been sweet. They've so obediently taken each action I've required of them. Walked when I needed them to walk, erased what I needed them to erase, built what I needed them to build.

God, you stood right where I'm standing. You made all things, and you came hereliving, serving, loving, building, accomplishing, finishingto know me inside out. To know your creation, your people. 

"I could stay here all day," my daughter says, beaming. 







Stay here all day. That's it. I made the connection.

God, sometimes I'm slow, but I made the connection.

Walk out on the water. Go exploring. Discover the growth. Through the difficult, the scary, the times of ease, the times of beauty, times of uncertainty, times of seasonal change ...


 




When you don't know what God is doing, do what you love. 

He's given you love. O Soul Within, find what you love. Do what you love. Continue doing what you love. He gave you a heart, to please, to love, to obey, to build, to follow, to lead, to accomplish, to do the thing He's called you to.

Step in character with whom God made you to be, into the very shoes He designed for you.

Change is never easy ... but proceed.

So ask the hard questions. Get inside God's head. Yearn to know His heart. 

You are His and He is yours, intertwined. He's where you are. He rejoices when you rejoice; He surely cries when you cry.

Find that placewith Himwhere you could stay all day. The place to do the living and dying. The place to typeThe Beginning and The End.

Do you want to go?


~~~
How has God been speaking to your heart?

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

A Prayer For A Persistence That Will Stand


The truck veered off the busy county road. 

My eyes widened. Really? I've been wanting to take a picture of this for forever. A warm smile spread over my face on this beautiful autumn day. 

"Watch where you put your foot."

"I will." I opened the door, stepped one foot out. Just tall grass. And honestly, I don't care. You know that car pulled over, someone taking a picture on the road-side? Yes, that's probably me. I've suffered swarms of fire-ant bites to feed baby calves. It's irrelevant. 

There she stood. Tall, broad, but rusty and weary. Falling to pieces. Watching her, I could imagine the groans on the inside. But she's still standing. The most beautiful barn I've ever seen. Well, not quite. I guess that position will always belong to the barn on my grandparent's property. But each barn is so beautiful to me. 




The timing, the setting=perfection. The tall grass wavy in the breeze. A perfect pond set in front of the masterpiece. A clump of old logs sat piled off to the side. 



I rested my arms over the gate, steadying myself for the perfect photo. Something to capture what only my eyes can fully embrace.

Got it. Well, maybe.

Only then did my eyes shift past the beauty to the busy interstate beyond. Cars, trucks zooming by. Businesses, billboards, and clutter lining the background.




I released my held breath.

Lord, give me persistence to endure this life, this writing life, this family life, this walk of faith, this daughter life, this mother life, this sister life. 

Keep my eyes focused on you, on the beauty, for forever. 

I thought over my first published article, 2007, like the moment was yesterday. I pressed the answering machine to hear the recording. "Congratulations, Shelli. Your persistence paid off." Tears streamed. Joy filled my heart. A characteristic some would loathe took me one step further down the road I so love. 




I snapped picture after picture. 

Rested my arms again. 

Father, you know my inward pains and groans. You know my heart. Give me what it takes to persist. Use me. Gift me. To gift others. Let my resolve be strong. 

Let my foot keep stepping out in spite of the surrounding fears, in peace. This little girl from Texas, the one who sweat bullets to stand in front of others. The one whose greatest fear in life was an oral book report. The one who ducked down low in her seat to keep from reading aloud, praying the teacher's sight would pass me by.




Father, how you can take our greatest fears and turn them into our greatest dreams is beautiful. Breath-taking.

Keep me standing. Keep my resolve tall and broad through the rusty and weary moments. Because the rusty and weary add character and beauty to my life's picture. The clump of old logs that seems a hindrance to the photo adds beauty. Vintage beauty to a life. 

Help me to embrace, utilize, and see with your eyes all that is before methe encouraging friends lining the view whose support and nourishment seems miles deep, those continually waving me on.

Allow my persistence to be beautiful to someone. Let my resolve persist like an old Texas barn, still standing after all these years. Because Father, your timing, your filter, your setting equal perfection. 















   

Do you have a heart request? How may I pray for you?

And I have an article in October's issue of WMU's Mission Mosaic magazine and a cover story in November's on missions in Philly.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

When You Need Divine Intervention


One foot in front of the other. I leap over the one remaining stump on the property. And my muscles scream out in reluctance with each step. It's been a while, a while since I've jogged. But I've been thrust into middle age, and I want to be the best middle-ager I can be.

Every cell hollers, "What are you doing to me?" as they jostle around. "We need divine intervention," they cry.

Trying to lead, the sheep bump into me. They haven't quite figured out the follow thing, and I stumble to regain ground. This middle-ager thing has my joints crying out, too. In the last month, my pain-free legs have turned achy and don't pound the ground with steadiness like they used to. 







The neighbor's donkey and goats stare at me as I pass, wanting me to stop. Eeyore's silky soft nose calls to me. Thank goodness for the trees, hiding me from plain view.






I turn the corner, pass the swing, and almost jump out of this middle-ager skin. I stop abruptly. 

My daughter is sitting there, huffing and puffing. "I tried to catch up with you," she says, struggling to speak between breaths. Inhaling deeply, she continues, "I called your name, but you didn't stop."

She'd taken the short-cut to catch up to me.


Tears sprang to my eyes.

I wrap her in my arms.

"I never want to miss your call." 

Never.

Arm in arm, this middle-ager and teen-ager walk side by side. We break loose, proceeding to finish this walk, one foot in front of the other.

"Do you want to jog?" I ask.

She's still huffing and puffing. "No."

We laugh.

My mind is still whirling with the fact that she had needed me. She'd been calling out to me. I'd missed her. 

But she'd caught me.




And I thought of the One who never misses my call. That very morning, only moments before the jog, God had answered my call. Not just my call. I'd been working on an article that was stumping me, knocking me down. I couldn't get the path, the plan. I had the information. But how can I make this the best it can be? How can I present this to glorify God? To honor the person it's about? 

Stumped. 

I slumped around the house all day yesterday. Sat at the computer and pieced together two stories, just a little different from the other. No good. "God, I need help." This usually comes fairly easy to me. What am I doing wrong? What am I doing differently? Have I been trying to take the short-cut? But this? Ugh. "Help me, God." 

I share the information with my family, in hopes to get pointed in the right direction. Nothing.

That's it. Stop everything. 

I write for help. 

I'd covet your prayers for an article I'm working on. Sometimes it's so easy, but sometimes, like now ... it's just hard. And I beg God to show me what He wants revealed from this precious person's life.

Instantly, one person after another offers to pray. Prayed right on the spot. For me. For this article. 

Lord, give Shelli eyes to see what you see in this precious person, and words to let the rest of us in on the secret. Amen.Shirlee Abbott

I love your tender heart, dear Shelli.Wendy Macdonald

You need divine guidance. I'll pray to that end.Norma Wieland

So many more. I went to bed, pulling the covers up under my chin, in perfect peace, knowing prayers were being lifted on my behalf. I thought of It's a Wonderful Life, everyone praying for George Bailey. Peace. A smile broke out.

I woke up this morning with a plan. Didn't do a single thing, but ran into my office and began typing away. The article came together, like always.

It is finished.




Tears sprang to my eyes. And my spirit clapped for God, clapped for His people for faith, His people of faith, for the chance at faith.

Where two or more are gathered. Yes.

He will be found.

We serve the One who answers the call.





Can you share a time when you needed intervention? 

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

God Uses The Broken Teacups


Company would be arriving soon.

I evaluated the dishes through the dirty glass. Evaluating my options, I saw the good, and I saw the broken. Through my distorted lens.



I opened the door and reached inside the cabinet.

My fingertip circled the the porcelain edges, settling and lodging into the chipped surface, and I thought not to use that piece. Another dish had been pieced and glued back together. No good.

Cracks and lines showing. Stained.

They weren't good enough to use. They weren't presentable. I'd been told that all my life. Someone could get injured. Someone would be embarrassed.

Use the good. Use the best. Act as though you're serving the King.

























My heart sank low. What if God never used the broken? What if we embarrassed him? What if He kept the damaged hidden away? Because of the way that it looked or the way that it felt.

What if He had the mind of man? My heart sank lower.

I've felt it all my lifeI'm fake. I'm not whole, not good enough, not proper enough. I'm not deserving. I'm an embarrassment. 

To those who aren't broken.

Don't pick me. Don't use me. Don't raise your hand. Don't share your faith. Don't put her on display. She's broken. You're broken. 

Shelli, you're broken.

Your family can't be this or can't be that because ... you're broken.

She might hurt others. Being rough around the edges could hurt someone, inflict slight injury. They might think it's okay to be broken.



But He has the mind of God. Glory. My heart began to rise. And He whispered to my heartI'm the glue that binds you. I'll break you, but I'll bind you. I'm the glue sealing you together. I've settled and lodged into you. Because I'm your all. Does that not make you special? Valuable? User-worthy and user-friendly? 

Like me.

Fractures and chips chisel character into your life, like a vintage home's crown molding.

And If the cracks cause others to bleed, maybe they need my broken and binding, too. You leave that to me. God whisperedmaybe I know what I'm doing.

O Soul Within, who are you to judge who can and can't be used? Don't judge yourself, Shelli. Don't bully yourself.

God sees all. The glass is never too dirty for Him to see. He's sees the broken and unbroken. 

And He reaches for you.



He sees you from a distance, and He sees you magnified. God sees the whole picture.
























He sees the lines, He feels the cracks, and He still takes you by the hand. 

Because what is real? Real is what you have to give. What I feel ... what I see ... me.

When the brokenness causes a resemblance to Himbroken like Jesusplace out the fractured, chipped, and the glued. Set the table.

His is the company we seek to please. We're serving the King.

Gratefulness in my heart had awoken.

We serve a God who uses the broken.



Friday, August 26, 2016

Scraping Certain Memories Out The Back Door


My grandmother never wasted anything, not a plastic butter container, not a milk jug, not a scrap of fabric. What didn't clutter her kitchen counters, cluttered her storage spaces. She didn't throw away anything, not even leftover scraps from a meal. Surely a sheer reflection of the Depression. Because a scrap of fabric could be used to make a quilt, a milk jug could store water for electrical outages.

Watching her scrape off the plates, all extra food going into a tin plate, is a sweet memory. "I'll throw it out to the dogs," she'd say, and wipe her hands on the front of her flour-covered blouse. When all the plates had been cleared and washed, the counters and tables all cleaned, we'd take the tin plate, heaped with food scraps, and head to the back door. The screen door would screech open, and the dogs would come running. There was no disguising or mistaking her scrap-pile... the dogs ran to it and so did the swarming flies. Stomach-turning remnants covered the ground.





Memoriesit's what we bring into the storehouse of our hearts and minds. It's a precious commodity, something we keep. Something we hope to hang onto all our lives, until our last breath.

But we have good, and well, we have bad.

And sometimes it seems like the bad just grows and grows, like yeast has been added to the disagreeable ingredients. Just gets fatter and fatter, busting and bursting out the doors and windows of our minds and hearts. The guest overstays his welcome and takes up too much space. The guest gets bossy and decides who'll eat where, who'll sit where, who'll sleep where, and who'll need to make accommodations for the night. He pushes out all the good.

And he just eats and eats away at your nerves, your confidence, your faith, even your memory of good.

And we look around and see that our counters are covered and cluttered with leftovers, dirt and grime, and a stench that can't be described, unworthy of description. Even the cow-trails remaining are threatened. Leftovers needing to be thrown out to the dogs and the flies.

We can't always choose what comes in and out of our lives, but we can choose what stays, what stays inside. We can choose what needs to be thrown out.





Like standing at my front living room window, at only eight years old, watching my daddy drive away ... away forever from my family. Tears pouring out my eyes, I cried, "Daddy, Daddy, I love you." Oh, my daddy.

Like feeling the sting of rejection. The 8th grade boy who walked by my middle-school desk and said with a scowl, "You have long, skinny fingers. And your hair looks like Medusa."


Like grieving over a huge mistake. Only a kid and ruining my life.


Those are leftovers, throw-out memories. Not throw-away, just throw-out. We'll never be entirely free of them. But our good memories don't deserve to be pushed out the door. Our good memories deserve the guest of honor place at our table.

And O Soul Within, some ground-breaking news, that's what we'll make up our mind to do. We have to be intentional in this life, tend to the memories, because another has unhealthy intentions for us.

O Soul Within, gather those leftovers, one by one. The ones that stink and destroy. Scrape them into the tin scrap bowl of honor. Because that tin bowl deserves a place of honor, too. It's the temporary storage that keeps our countersour hearts and mindsfree and clean. Free of all the dirt and grime, leaving room for all the cleanthe China, the teacups, faith, Christ-esteem, space, lovely space.





Take those steps, one by one.

Open that back door and bask in the beautiful sounds of the screechy screenthe gatekeeper to our hearts, the one that stays closed and only opens when you choose. Only opens when the bad needs to be thrown out or used ... blessedly used for good. Not used for bad. And that's why they aren't throw-aways because sometimes God uses our throw-outs. 

Scrape it out, sweep it out, let it drop, let it fly. Toss it to the bottom-land, like nobody's business. Let it stay. Let the dogs come, let the flies swarm. Because that's the back door. The scrap pile. No one else needs to go there, because it's nobody's business. Only your selected few come through there.





And then you smile, walk back into your clean kitchen, take a deep breath, and bask in the wonderful sights and smells of the new, the apple pie scent wafting, the fresh bread baking, the sun shining in through the front window, rays so vivid and beautiful you could reach out and touch them

Like knowing your daddy loves you with all his heart and remembering how he tells you often, how you'll always be his little angel no matter how old you get.

Like being named Homecoming Queen your senior year, and the one who called you all those names wants to escort you.


Like feeling the tiny fingers and toes of your newborn, 18 years ago, and counting them one by one. And knowing your mistake may very well have led you here, to this child, to this beautiful place.






  

Like knowing with all your heart that God knows what's best and directs your steps, and even uses your past.

Prop open the front door, and hang the welcome sign. Bring out the white, clean tablecloth, unfold it a tad, and thrust it out. Open wide. Spread it out over the dining room table in your spacious heart, and place the best China because ... well ... it's time for a new meal, for a real meal, for a feast. A beautiful, clean, new feast. With guests of our choosing. Only guests of our choosing. Welcomed guests.

With remnants of love, blessing, and honor.



~~~

Do you have difficult, painful memories? Have you struggled with letting them keep a prominent place in your mind and heart? Do you have any thing you need to toss out?